Creating Cognitive Dissonance for Fun and Profit, and More Aswiebe’s Market List Updates

One of my favorite writer-tricks is when something the reader thinks they understand is mentioned, and then that something acts in a way that breaks the reader’s understanding. The oft-quoted example of this is Heinlein’s, “The door irised open…”

I love this as both a reader and a writer. As a reader, I can literally feel the pieces shifting around in my mind when this happens. As a writer, I love things that appear simple at first and later reveal themselves to be much more complex.

This is particularly handy in science fiction (or horror). Humans have a tendency to call things after what we know, even if it isn’t quite the same. A clever writer can build the strangeness piece-by-piece around what seems superficially similar.

“Good boy, Rex!” Lucy beamed at her dog and tossed him a treat.


Rex grabbed the treat out of the air with one tentacle, wagging his tail furiously the whole time.

Technology evolves. But after the initial, “This is something different!” reaction, we often go back to calling it by the same old name.

We’re all carrying a real-world SFnal example of this around in our pockets, too. I don’t refer to my “handheld mobile cellular telephone,” or even my “cellphone” anymore–it’s just my phone.

I think about this when I read an older science fiction story where the writer obviously went through an intense struggle to name and describe something futuristic that fills a niche that isn’t really all that different.

It doesn’t have to be that hard. It can be easy, if you lean into the dissonance.

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

Thank you for your patience! I’ve been trying to overhaul my author website (not the same as the market list one). My brain weasels told me that writing this newsletter had to be contingent on finishing part of my author website … which is why this newsletter is going out truly, absurdly later than the normal schedule. I had to corral my brain weasels first, and they’re wiley!

No, the website is not yet done. Yes, I will get to it soon. Yes, you should expect another market list update newsletter in a week or so. Although this newsletter is going out late, the most recent market listing updates were done earlier.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

7 Things I Learned While Writing Across Genres: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/7-things-i-learned-while-writing-across-genres

The Set List: How to Order Short Stories in a Collection: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/the-set-list-how-to-order-short-stories-in-a-collection

10 Questions to Ask Yourself for an Airtight Plot: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/10-questions-to-ask-yourself-for-an-airtight-plot

Story Questions: The Secret to Narrative Thrust: https://paulamunier.com/story-questions-the-secret-to-narrative-thrust/

Featured Market

The Little Guts anthology (Little Ghosts Press) wants your pitches for gross, gory horror, pays CA$.12/word (about US$.088). Submit pitch only.

Hey all! Lor here. Some of you might know me for my love of GROSS, GOOPY HORROR—which is exactly what this anthology aims to be! I’ll be looking for pitches that evoke FUN and DISGUST, like Peter Jackson’s Braindead, and the films of Frank Henelotter. Shows like Freaky Stories and Aaahh!!! Real Monsters. Like a pig in mud, we revel in the nasty and go, “hey, check this out! Made me want to barf!” Give me fluids! Guts and gore! Slime, ooze and GOOP!

Your story can feature dark themes and heavy topics, but have FUN with it. There are no restrictions. Content warnings will be made available when the book is published. All writers of any skill level or background are encouraged to submit!Little Ghosts Press

Basics: horror, submit pitch for 2,000-5,000wd story, reprints not mentioned, pays CA$.12/word. Pitches due: 5/31/24.

Guidelines: https://www.littleghostsbooks.com/submission-call

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they're looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/.  For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe's Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!
Screenshot of April market list updates

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists

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Unintentional Promises to the Reader–Oops!, a Contest for Non-Professional Writers, and More

Do writers know when they’re making promises to their readers? Sometimes. Not always.

How can a writer spot accidental promises? Critique partners are invaluable here. But when doing your own revisions, the most useful self-editing technique is to keep an eye out for unintentional foreshadowing and misplaced emotional weight.

Did you spend a lot of time describing that ornate door that your main character walks past every day? Maybe you just needed to get your wordcount in, or you were warming up to the story. But in the reader’s mind, that door now glows with importance. If your main character doesn’t go through that door–or even if they do, but nothing exciting happens on the other side–the reader is going to be frustrated.

Did you mention an extremely dramatic element, even just in passing? Maybe there’s a deadly storm coming that’s expected to just barely miss the main character. Maybe there’s a big magical trial coming up. Maybe the corporate overlords are planning layoffs. These are classic Chekhov’s gun situations. Just by existing, they promise major drama.

Characters themselves can be dramatic elements.

Is there sexual or romantic tension between characters? You better believe the reader expects something to come of this.

Have you mentioned a missing or estranged loved one multiple times, to build your main character’s tragic backstory? The reader expects a resolution of some kind, or at least a heart-wrenching attempt and failure to connect.

Is there a minor character who keeps stealing every scene they’re in? They now want a story arc, too, however slight and off-page. Note: keeping this story arc mostly off-page provides a great opportunity to write it as a short story reward for readers.

Of course, after a writer has identified unintentional promises they made to their reader, the hard part starts: deciding whether to fulfill the promise, or rip it out of the story. This can be especially challenging when the promise is entangled in characters’ relationships. But the author is the only one who can decide if the promise’s existence supports or takes away from the focus of the story. No pressure!

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

I have a science fiction reading at DreamHaven Books in Minneapolis TONIGHT. If you’re in the Twin Cities, you’re invited!

On Wednesday, March 20th, ABRA STAFFIN-WIEBE reads and holds a reception as part of the Speculations Reading Series, from 6:30-7:45 p.m. at DreamHaven Books, 2301 E 38th St, Minneapolis.

Abra Staffin-Wiebe is a science fiction author who loves futuristic fairy tales, cheerful horror, and dark science fiction. Dozens of her stories have appeared at award-winning publications including Tor.com, Escape Pod, and Fireside Magazine.

Bring a friend! There will be cookies and soda as well as giveaways during the reading. Afterwards, we usually adjourn to Parkway Pizza for some social time.

If you’re on Facebook, event updates can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/events/6905583366237017

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

How to Make Google Show You the Good Search Results Again: https://lifehacker.com/tech/how-to-get-more-accurate-google-search-results

Rules, What Rules: The Passive Voice (Should not be Written In): https://aarubin.wordpress.com/2024/03/08/rules-what-rules-the-passive-voice-should-not-be-written-in/

Worldbuilding With Legs: Incorporating Insects into Your Stories: https://www.fantasy-magazine.com/fm/non-fiction/worldbuilding-with-legs-incorporating-insects-into-your-stories/

Can ChatGPT edit fiction?: https://theconversation.com/can-chatgpt-edit-fiction-4-professional-editors-asked-ai-to-do-their-job-and-it-ruined-their-short-story-216631

34 Transformative Prompts to Unlock Your Writing, Courtesy Kelly Link: https://lithub.com/34-transformative-prompts-to-unlock-your-writing-courtesy-kelly-link/

On fast rejections: https://neil-clarke.com/on-fast-rejections/

Writing Hasn’t Won Me Fame or Fortune But It’s Brought Me Friendship: https://janefriedman.com/writing-hasnt-won-me-fame-or-fortune-but-its-brought-me-friendship/

3 Tips for Writing Cosmic Horror That “Goes Beyond”: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/tips-for-writing-cosmic-horror-that-goes-beyond

Featured Market

The Geek Partnership Society’s Annual Writing Contest for non-professional writers is open until 4/30/24!

This contest provides a forum for new talent of any age and gives them a chance to learn about the publication process and its requirements. The submission requirements are not negotiable, nor should this contest be used as a required class exercise by teachers. Teachers, please encourage your students to enter our contest but making it a homework assignment goes against the spirit of the contest.

Entries must be science fiction, fantasy, horror, supernatural, and alternate history in short fiction, poetry, or graphic stories (comic).

Please select a division to enter. You may only enter one short fiction division. You have the option to also enter a poem in the Poetry Division and/or a short comics in the Graphic Novel (Comics) Division.

  • Open: Short fiction only. Open to writers of any age. There may be TWO (2) winners chosen from this category. The Open Division winner will be chosen from all entries.
    • An additional local writer may be chosen from contestants residing within 200 miles of Geek Partnership Society to receive the Scott Imes Award. This award proudly honors Scott Imes, a major force in the Twin Cities’ science fiction reading and writing community who passed away in December 2001. For over two decades, Scott Imes worked at Uncle Hugo’s Science Fiction Bookstore and promoted the speculative fiction genres. His recommendations served those far beyond its doors.
  • Poetry: Poems only. Open to writers of any age.
  • Youth 1: Short fiction only. Open to writers 13 years of age or younger as of April 30, 2024.
  • Youth 2: Short fiction only. Open to writers 14-16 years of age as of April 30, 2024.
  • Graphic Novel (Comics): Short comics only. Open to writers of any age.

Geek Partnership Society

Basics: speculative fiction and poetry, 5,000 word maximum, no reprints, prizes range from $50-$100. Submissions due: 4/30/24.

Guidelines: https://geekpartnership.org/programs/writing-contest/

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of March update spreadsheet

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe's Market List will be after 4/15/2024. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/
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B.I.G. Goals, a Weird Fiction Submission Call, and More

The beginning of the year is a time for dreaming big. So–dream big! Forget about S.M.A.R.T. goals (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound). Forget about small daily wordcounts, and incremental improvements. Make some B.I.G. goals: Beautiful, Inspirational, Grandiose.

Now lean back in your chair, or wherever you’re reading this newsletter, close your eyes, and take two minutes to imagine these things happening for you. Imagine getting that agent phone call. Imagine seeing your name on the cover of that magazine. Imagine getting that glowing review. Imagine being asked to give a reading at your favorite bookstore–or heck, your favorite university or big tech company.

If you didn’t close your eyes and actually daydream, do that now. This newsletter will still be here when you open your eyes. Set a 2-minute timer on your phone if you have to give yourself permission.

Okay. You’ve daydreamt. You can imagine it vividly. Now write this big, ridiculously huge goal down. Or make a vision board collage, if that feels more natural to you. Either way, put this goal reminder in someplace that you will see daily.

No, really. Take a couple of minutes and do it right now, even if it feels silly. There’s actual science behind that.  If you put your goals where you see them often, you’re more likely to be guided by them when making choices. Get your subconscious working for you!

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

I encountered the first trigger for my “make a fun one” writing resolution! I did not expect to find a flash fiction call in 4theWords, but there it was.

… And of course, my attempt to write a flash piece under 1,000 words resulted in a 1,900+ word short story. It still counts! It was in response to a flash fiction call, I wrote it in a short period of time, and most importantly, I had a lot of fun writing it. Even better, the contest also has a short story category, so I can still submit it. I’m delighted with the charming fantasy that resulted. If you’re a 4theWords member, you can read “My Familiar (Didn’t) Eat My Homework” here: https://app.4thewords.com/community/reading/book/abrasw/my-familiar-didnt-eat-my-homework-1

Save the date! In other news for Minnesota locals, my Dreamhaven reading has been rescheduled to March 20, 2024, at 6:30pm. More details closer to the reading.


Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

All the Types of Science Fiction: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/all-the-types-of-science-fiction

10 Tips For Applying to Writing Residencies: https://electricliterature.com/10-tips-for-applying-to-writing-residencies/

Fanfiction Authors: HEADS UP: https://www.tumblr.com/mckitterick/740279699840876545

Tools for Thinking About Censorship: https://www.exurbe.com/tools-for-thinking-about-censorship/

Another Word: Chasing the High: https://clarkesworldmagazine.com/another_word_06_14/

Mastering Beats and Tags to Improve Your Dialogue: https://careerauthors.com/mastering-beats-and-tags-to-improve-your-dialogue/

How to Spot a Fake Literary Agency: https://writerbeware.blog/2023/12/15/how-to-spot-a-fake-literary-agency/

Peak Fake: A Scam Website Impersonating Macmillan Publishers: https://writerbeware.blog/2024/01/19/peak-fake-a-scam-website-impersonating-macmillan-publishers/

DIMENSIONS OF WONDER: George Saunders in a Haunted Mansion with Chocolate Mint (pantsing a plot): https://locusmag.com/2023/11/dimensions-of-wonder-george-saunders-in-a-haunted-mansion-with-chocolate-mint-by-eugenia-triantafyllou/

Featured Market

The Silence (ed. Dave Brzeski) anthology wants themed weird fiction, due 3/31/24.

For this project, it is essential that you read or have already read all six of Algernon Blackwood’s John Silence stories from 1908. Five of these were published in John Silence, Physician Extraordinary, and are available to read or download free through Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/49222

… Stories should have all the following elements:

  1. John Silence as a key element. In keeping with the original stories, Silence does not have to be the main protagonist throughout. He may, for example, be the authority of last resort, the deus ex machina who saves the day, the instigator of events, etc. Removal of Silence from the story, on the other hand, should significantly detract from it.
  2. Silence as the canonical psychic doctor in the style that Blackwood envisaged, with the same general nature and modus operandi. Writers are welcome to add to aspects of the character (within sensible limits) but should not deduct from his already stated characteristics.
  3. Setting, societal and technological aspects in keeping with the Edwardian period, or any reasonable period up to the late nineteen thirties, remembering that Silence would be getting on a bit by then.
  4. A decided psychic, paranormal, supernatural or occult problem. Unusual psychological problems or issues may also qualify. Stories about general monster hunting and classic monsters are unlikely to be chosen, unless their approach is particularly innovative and relates to Silence’s established range of activities.

Basics: themed weird fiction, 6,000 word minimum, no reprints, pays $150. Submissions due: 3/31/24.

Guidelines: https://horrortree.com/taking-submissions-silence/

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of updates from January

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe’s Market List will be after 2/15/2024. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/

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New Year’s Resolutions: Make A Fun One!

‘Tis the season to talk about New Year’s resolutions, and SMART goal setting (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound). But that’s not all it has to be.

I was thinking about this because of the Pasta Quest / Fruit Adventures meme that is going around. The gist of it is that resolutions can be fun, like eating as many different pasta shapes in a year as possible, or eating and learning about a new fruit every time you see one.

Of course we want our readers to have fun when they’re reading our stories. If they don’t have some kind of enjoyment from reading it, they’re not likely to come back for more! But often writers focus on hard numbers when they’re coming up with their goals for the new year: this many words written; this many stories submitted; this many hours of butt-in-chair, fingers-on-keyboard; or this many words written every day, no matter if you’re sick or busy or not feeling it.

These goals have a purpose and a place. But they don’t sound all that fun, do they?

So this year, think about adding a fun one to your New Year’s writing resolutions. What is especially fun for you about writing? What is silly? What is play? What writing-related thing will you have fun doing even if the result never sees the light of day?

A few ideas:
* When you introduce a new character, as a writing exercise, write a scene of them eating a meal. Just for fun, not as part of the story.
* Take a class about something that interests you. Make that part of your next main character.
* Make a sketch of every new character. Stick figures are A-OK.
* Build new fantasy/science fiction worlds based on the history, culture, or geography of every continent on Earth.
* Create a new language, and use it in a story.
* Rewrite the ending of someone else’s story that you didn’t like.
* Every time you read a book or story that you really, really love, write down 3 things the author did that you really liked–tropes, a twist ending, a type of character, a detailed description of a particular type of thing–and pick one of them to try and do, in your own way, in your next story.
* Make a list of new places that you will write next year. Art museums, coffee shops, parks, cafes, libraries. Check them off the list when you’ve tried them.
* Mimic a different style of writing each month of the year.
* Freewrite for 5 minutes every day, based on Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Let me know if you come up with another fun one! I’d love to make a list.

My fun one for this New Year’s writing resolutions is flash fiction. Every month, the first time (at least!) I see a submission call for flash fiction, I will write something for it. I won’t over-polish it. I’ll spend half an hour planning and brainstorming a story immediately after I see the submission guidelines. And after I’ve had a chance to sleep on it and let my subconscious do its thing, I’ll spend a solid hour writing on it.

2024 will be my year of flashing!

(But not the nekkid kind. LOL, I live in Minnesota–I would die.)

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

The never-ending ending of my WiP continues with the not ending!

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

What I Wish I’d Known Before Launching My Newsletter: https://inboxcollective.com/what-i-wish-id-known-before-launching-my-newsletter/

The Writer’s Guide to the Holidays: https://careerauthors.com/the-writers-guide-to-the-holidays/

Genre Grapevine on Machine Learning’s Problem with Bad Stories and Bad Intentions: https://www.patreon.com/posts/95493900

Working Out, Working In: Applying the Six Principles of Athletic Training to Writing and Creative Work: https://www.themarginalian.org/2023/12/17/exercise-writing/

Tenses, Distance, and Persons: https://ilona-andrews.com/blog/tenses-tightness-and-persons/

Featured Market

Psychopomp wants death-themed novellas, is open for submissions 1/1/24 – 4/30/24.

  • stories where grief or loss play a leading role
  • stories that feature the afterlife or the underworld
  • stories that involve the journey through death/the journey of the dead
  • stories that involve death personified (Death!)
  • stories that take place in, or utilize a multiverse
  • stories that involve time travel (esp. those that involve time travel + a previously mentioned theme)
  • origin stories (especially as they relate to previously mentioned themes)
  • stories where the characters slowly lose their sense of reality
  • goth
  • space, but make it goth
  • a story within a story within a (within a story that’s [within a story] within a story) story….
  • stories where things that are not usually personified ARE personified (planets? galaxies? time? …bones?)
  • creepy meta-horror
  • amazingly original ghost stories
Psychopomp

Basics: themed speculative fiction novellas, 20,000 – 40,000 words, no reprints, pays $750 + royalties. Submissions due: 1/1/24 – 4/30/24.

Guidelines: https://psychopomp.com/novella-guidelines/

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they're looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/.  For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe's Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!
Snapshot of latest updates

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists

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How Long Since You Wrote?

Thoughts in Passing

How long has it been since you last wrote fiction? When you stop and think about it, does the answer to that question surprise you? Do you even know how long it’s been?

More than once, I’ve found myself startled to realize how long it has been since I had a real writing session. It’s usually not an intentional choice. It’s life. Things happen. Recently, it was covid + a nasty chest cold, followed by my family getting stomach flu, and then Thanksgiving travel was upon us. This could definitely have been worse–we could have been sick during Thanksgiving. But it definitely dented my ability to sit down and write in a focused way.

I don’t think I would have noticed exactly how much it affected me if it wasn’t for NaNoWriMo.

Obviously, the question, “Do you know how long it’s been since you wrote?” is not for those of you who have been doing NaNoWriMo! If you did NaNoWriMo, congratulations. Congratulations if you wrote the full number of words to “win.” Congratulations if you don’t make it, but you still wrote more words than you thought you could in one month! Congratulations if you wrote any number of words, at all. You brought new sentences into the world, and that’s a pretty awesome thing.

I didn’t try to do NaNoWriMo this year, but I still benefited from the special NaNoWriMo event hosted by 4theWords (a website that gamifies writing, complete with quests and monsters to defeat by wordcount). Here’s how.

Tracking.  Writing. Streaks. 

As simple as that! How many days in a row had I written a certain number of words? The days stack up. Keeping the chain going can add motivation. More importantly, for me, it builds a daily habit of thinking about how many words I’ve written that day.

Building that habit doesn’t require a special month or a special app*. You can track it with a spreadsheet. You can track it with a paper calendar that you put stickers on. You can track it by gouging hash marks into the wall of your writing dungeon, if you have a writing dungeon and you don’t mind causing a little property damage.

If your answer was that you don’t know how long it has been since you last wrote regularly–and if that answer bothered you–you might benefit from making a habit of tracking your writing every day, even on those days when the number of words you wrote was zero.

* If you would like to use an app, there are many habit-tracking apps available. If you like making a game of writing, 4theWords is fun. If you want a tracker that also helps you meet a deadline (and is free), I recommend Pacemaker at https://www.pacemaker.press.

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

I’ve been working on the never-ending ending of my WiP! I swear, it keeps getting longer… Funny how that works.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

5 Rules for Writing Humorous Urban Fantasy: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/5-rules-for-writing-humorous-urban-fantasy

Featured Market

The Mike Resnick Memorial Award for Short Fiction (annual) wants SF by new writers, is open for submissions 11/15 – 4/1.

Short Story (definition): A story up to 7,499 words, as defined by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).

New Author (definition): An author who has not had any fiction work published (including short stories, novelettes, novellas, and novels in paper, digital or audio form) that has been paid a per-word rate of 6 cents a word or more or received a payment for any single work of fiction totaling more than $50.

If the author has self-published the piece then their total earnings from any single piece of fiction may not exceed $50 from all published venues.

Eligibility: Entries should be a new science fiction short story written a new author who affirms their story was not in any way plagiarized off of any other work, nor written (in part or whole) with the assistance of AI apps or programs.Arc Manor Books

Basics: science fiction, limited author demographic: new authors, up to 7,499 words, no reprints, 1st – $250, 2nd – $100, 3rd – $50. Submissions due: 4/1/2.

Guidelines: https://www.arcmanorbooks.com/resnick

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of November updates

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe's Market List will be after 12/15/2023. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/
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Last Chance to Submit This Year!

Okay, so it’s not necessarily your last chance to submit a story in 2023. But it might be! Many publications shut down for the holiday season. They won’t accept new submissions. Even if others don’t shut down, the odds are good that their response times will slooooooow down. This goes for agents, short story markets, book publishers, everyone.

What is the holiday season? The slowdown starts the week of the United States’ Thanksgiving break, which is the week of Nov 20th this year. And many publications are flat-out closed the entire month of December. The good news is that these publications often have one last submission period in the month of November.

So if you have something that you’re working on, you may want to put in some extra writing and revising time to get it out for submission as soon as possible. 

If you’re planning on doing NaNoWriMo, you have a couple more days to wrap up your writing-in-progress before that chaos begins! And remember, I’ve got a collection of useful links about increasing your productivity right here: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/#htoc-productivity

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

Sadly, I had to cancel my reading at Dreamhaven Books due to catching Covid. I’m fully recovered now, thanks to Paxlovid and Metformin. But between catching the really nasty chest cold that’s been going around, and then swapping cold-for-covid with my spouse, that was several annoying weeks of sickness and recovery for our family. The reading is likely to be rescheduled for early 2024.

I have a Halloween publication! My story, “You Are in the Heart of the Corn Maze,” came out in the Fall issue of Fear Forge. This story’s a bit about the pandemic, and parenting, and the parts of ourselves we suppress. And a corn maze!

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

Orbit, an imprint of Hachette Book Group, is offering 14 free online events on the topic of “How to Write Your First SFF Novel”, covering inspiration, POV, outlining (or not), retellings, worldbuilding, tropes and trope subversion, magic, settings, romance, ensemble casts, heroes and villains, writing while working/caretaking, scene structure, and expanding a book. The guests include James S. A. Corey, C L Clark, P. Djèlí Clark, Megan E. O’Keefe, Tasha Suri, Fonda Lee, Ann Leckie, and more. Sign up here: https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/orbit-books/how-to-write-your-first-sff-novel/
Date range: Oct 11 – Nov 15. Recordings will be available after the scheduled live event, too.

Publish (on your) Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere: https://indieweb.org/POSSE

The Indie Files: Wide For The Win 2 – Retail Promotions: https://www.sfwa.org/2023/10/17/indie-files-wide-for-the-win-2-retail-promotions/

Safety Dispatch: How to Establish and Use a Pen Name: https://www.sfwa.org/2023/10/24/safety-dispatch-how-to-establish-use-pen-name/

How to Get (& Stay) Ready for NaNoWriMo: https://careerauthors.com/how-to-get-stay-ready-for-nanowrimo/

GHOSTS WITH THE MOST! Five tips to make your ghost stories truly haunting: https://horrortree.com/ghosts-with-the-most-five-tips-to-make-your-ghost-stories-truly-haunting/

Money-Saving Guide for Authors and Writers (resource links): https://couponfollow.com/research/money-saving-guide-authors-writers

This new data poisoning tool lets artists fight back against generative AI: https://www.technologyreview.com/2023/10/23/1082189/data-poisoning-artists-fight-generative-ai/

You Just Found Out Your Book Was Used to Train AI. Now What? https://authorsguild.org/news/you-just-found-out-your-book-was-used-to-train-ai-now-what/

How to Use Bookbub with a Limited Budget: https://insights.bookbub.com/bookbub-limited-budget/

How to Write Scary Novels Infused with Fun and Humor: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/how-to-write-scary-novels-infused-with-fun-and-humor

Plot Method: Jot, Bin, Pants: https://docs.google.com/document/d/17t0dYvl2noZS9WEQI-Cjx1Go0GUa1ZxmHnpMT-aiTeM/edit

Featured Market

Winter in the City: A Collection of Dark Urban Stories (House of Gamut) is looking for dark fantasy, dark SF, and horror themed to a real-world city in winter.

Noisy, crowded, ever in motion, the City can be more than a setting—it can be a character, as nuanced and as fickle as a human being, with as many traits and quirks as the best mapped out characters. The City can be the ever-present and constant companion (or foe) to the protagonist and antagonist alike. 

Winter in the City: A Collection of Dark Urban Stories is an anthology that takes place in different cities around the world during the bleak—sometimes harsh—season of winter. Your story submission must conform to the guidelines listed below and feature the City—in fact, the title of each story will be the City of which you write. 

We are not looking for vampire/werewolf love trysts. We are looking for fantastical elements within the City itself. 

Because we all know—deep in our hearts—that nightmares and fairies, monsters and ghosts, and terrors of the real and imagined call the City their home. 

GUIDELINES: 

• Short stories (3000-7500 words) that feature something fantastical in a city during winter. Your story will be titled by the city name (i.e. “Boston” or “Sydney”). 

• In this case a “city” should be considered a large population center (over 200,000 permanent inhabitants. 

• The “city” should be a real place—no “Gotham City” or “Hogsmeade.” 

• PLEASE Confirm which city your story will take place in before starting to write.House of Gamut

Basics: dark speculative fiction, themed, 3,000 – 7,500 words, $.10/word, no reprints. Submissions due: 3/31/24

Guidelines: https://houseofgamut.moksha.io/publication/house-of-gamut

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they're looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe's Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!
A snippet of the October updates

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe’s Market List will be after 11/15/2023. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/

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Productive Procrastination with Flash Fiction

“I’m on deadline, so my house has never been cleaner.” I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard some version of that from my writer friends. It’s never worked for me, alas. My brain does not accept cleaning as a procrastination method from writing deadlines. However, it turns out that the reverse might be true!

This month, I was doing a cleaning and organizing challenge*. So naturally, my brain decided that I should be doing some writing instead. But not Big Writing, like working on my book. No, that would be too obviously not what I was supposed to be doing. But how about something smol and quick, with a deadline that meant I should obviously do it sooner rather than later?

That is how I ended up taking my daily quick freewriting exercise and tweaking it to fit a monthly flash fiction contest’s theme.

* Necessitated by the accumulating detritus that began when I participated in NaNoWriMo’s monthlong writing challenge right before the pandemic hit, and snowballed when … yeah. All that came with it.

Takeaway 1: Seriously, if you’re not a super-speedy writer and you’re planning on NaNoWriMoing this November, have prep plans and recovery plans for everything non-writing-related! Bonus points for actually writing your plans down in advance.

Takeaway 2: Don’t have time for a “serious” writing project? Not sure what you want to write next? Try something small and fun, like one of these monthly themed flash fiction contests. As always for publishers included in Aswiebe’s Market List, none of these charge fees and they all pay (a little–flash fiction is not usually highly remunerative!):

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

DreamHaven storefront in the Standish neighborhood
DreamHaven storefront in the Standish neighborhood, by Elcief (CC BY-SA 4.0)

If you’re in the Twin Cities area, I have a reading coming up in October at Dreamhaven!

On Wednesday, October 4, ABRA STAFFIN-WIEBE reads and holds a reception as part of the Speculations Reading Series, from 6:30-7:45 p.m. Abra Staffin-Wiebe is a science fiction author who loves futuristic fairy tales, cheerful horror, and dark science fiction. Dozens of her stories have appeared at award-winning publications including Tor.com, Escape Pod, and Fireside Magazine.

Bring a friend! There will be cookies and soda as well as giveaways during the reading. Afterwards, we usually adjourn to Parkway Pizza for some social time.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

Lucy Worsley’s 9 “Christie Tricks” for Mystery Writers: https://careerauthors.com/christie-tips-on-mystery-writing/

Hook Your Genre Readers on Page One: https://careerauthors.com/writing-for-genre/

5 Ways To Use Short Stories To Grow as a Writer: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/5-ways-to-use-short-stories-to-grow-as-a-writer

Publishing Contracts 101: Beware Internal Contradictions: https://writerbeware.blog/2022/06/10/publishing-contracts-101-beware-internal-contradictions/

How to Prevent AI Bots from Scraping Your Website: https://www.jonathancrowe.net/2023/09/how-to-prevent-ai-bots-from-scraping-your-website/

10 Tips for Building a Realistic and Vibrant Fictional World: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/10-tips-for-building-a-realistic-and-vibrant-fictional-world

Overdrive and Libraries: Everything You Wanted to Know: https://ilona-andrews.com/blog/overdrive-and-libraries-everything-you-wanted-to-know/

Featured Market

Tales & Feathers Magazine (Augur) will be opening soon for cozy fantasy submissions!

Our ideal submissions look like this:

  • Quiet character-driven storytelling
  • Gentle moments
  • Rich fantastical worldbuilding
  • Everyday moments
  • Stories that take place before or between or after the epic conflicts
  • Stories that offer warmth, comfort, and possibility

We welcome stories written in any fantasy genre or genres, including stories that blur genre lines. We are especially interested in high fantasy, fairy tales, and myth.

We also welcome stories that have been translated into English and stories that engage with non-Western fantasy genre traditions.Tales & Feathers

Basics: cozy fantasy, 1,000 – 2,500 words, CA$.11/word, no reprints. Submission periods: 10/1/23-10/21/23 BIPOC, trans, or disabled writers; 10/8/23-10/21/23 general submissions.

Guidelines: https://www.augurmag.com/submissions/

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of updated New Markets page

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists

Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe’s Market List will be after 10/15/2023. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/

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What Belongs In Fiction Submission Guidelines? plus Aswiebe’s Market List updates

Thoughts in Passing

What Belongs In Fiction Submission Guidelines?

Here are the basics of what should be in short fiction submission guidelines. If you follow me on social media, you may have seen me rant about some of these in “Dear Editors…” posts. This post is aimed at editors because that’s how much of it was originally phrased, but as a writer, it’s also helpful to know what you should expect to find in the guidelines.

0. Just starting out?

Are you in the process of establishing your publication? Not sure what your final pay rates or accepted wordcounts will be? That’s okay! It’s fine to adjust your guidelines later, as long as you are clear about what current accepted submissions will be paid, etc. You can say, “We are figuring out our long-term policies. Right now, we are reading for our first issue. Stories accepted for this issue will be paid $.08/word.” Changing your policies after you accept a submission is shady. If you plan to change your guidelines, consider pausing submissions and changing guidelines before the next submission period.

1. What kind of story do you want?

Genre, subgenre, any themes or particular vibes. It would be lovely if every writer had time to read several issues of every publication they ever might submit to, but that isn’t the reality. Putting this info up front will save you a lot of time in the slush pile. Genre magazines are generally pretty good about this. Realist literary magazines are generally pretty terrible at it.

2. How much do you pay?

Per word or a flat rate is the usual. “We pay at or above the industry standard rate” is not actually saying how much you pay. Industry standard can mean many different things. Pro rate changes depending on genre. Paying in “exposure” = non-paying. If you don’t list a pay rate, the assumption is that you don’t pay. One exception to this assumption is “Best of the Year” anthologies, which usually pay $.01/word. (They should still list the pay rate on their guidelines, but they often don’t.) If your pay rate depends on the success of a Kickstarter, be upfront about this! If you don’t pay in U.S. dollars, please specify your currency. Sorry, but USD are the standard.

Note: Charging submission fees is a common practice for realist literary magazines. But in science fiction and fantasy circles, Yog’s Law dictates that money flows to the writer. Charging submission fees is taboo, and patting yourself on the back for not charging fees is … weird.

3. What rights are you buying?

The subject of rights is really a whole essay by itself. Usually this is some version of First Rights for original (never-before-published) stories and Reprints Rights or One-Time Rights for reprints. Often there is a period of exclusivity and a right to archive the story for a particular length of time. Never say, “All rights stay with the author!” That is impossible. If you didn’t get any rights, you wouldn’t be allowed to publish their story. Publishing a story automatically uses First Rights, for one thing.

Don’t try to take All Rights. Don’t be a jerk.

4. What wordcounts do you accept?

What’s your minimum? What’s your maximum? If you don’t specify, please don’t be mad if you get flash fiction or novellas. If you don’t specify because you’re honestly good with getting flash fiction or novella submissions, it’s lovely to say so. Some of us have been snarled at by editors who assume their idea of acceptable story length is universal. It’s fine to say that people must query first for stories over X words.

5. How do you feel about reprints?

Do you accept reprint submissions? It’s also great to specify if they are given the same preference and if they will be paid at the same rate or not. If you don’t say you don’t accept reprints, expect to get some queries about them.

Beyond the basics…

6. Are simultaneous submissions okay? 

For bonus points, you could also specify if you accept simultaneous submissions–authors submitting to other magazines at the same time, which might mean a story you like gets accepted elsewhere before you respond.

7. What’s your submission schedule?

Once you figure out a submission schedule (Open all the time? Only open the third week in October in leap years?) and average response time, it’s very kind to include that information too.

Finally, please please please keep submission guidelines up even when you’re closed to submissions. Don’t erase the whole page. Just put a big SUBMISSIONS CLOSED UNTIL X at the top of the page, and temporarily hide the submissions email address if you need to.

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

If you’re in the Twin Cities area, I have a reading coming up in October at Dreamhaven!

On Wednesday, October 4, ABRA STAFFIN-WIEBE reads and holds a reception as part of the Speculations Reading Series, from 6:30-7:45 p.m. Abra Staffin-Wiebe is a science fiction author who loves futuristic fairy tales, cheerful horror, and dark science fiction. Dozens of her stories have appeared at award-winning publications including Tor.com, Escape Pod, and Fireside Magazine.

Bring a friend! There will be cookies and soda as well as giveaways during the reading. Afterwards, we usually adjourn to Parkway Pizza for some social time.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

Five Secrets to Writing Suspense: https://careerauthors.com/five-secrets-to-writing-suspense/

IMHO: What Remedies Do Authors Have When Fraudulent Work Appears on Amazon? : https://hotsheetpub.com/2023/08/imho-what-remedies-do-authors-have-when-fraudulent-work-appears-on-amazon/

5 Ways to Survive a Publishing Draught: https://careerauthors.com/5-ways-to-survive-a-publishing-drought/

My Book is Coming Out This Month. Here are Ten Things I Learned on the Way to Getting Published: https://horrortree.com/my-book-is-coming-out-this-month-here-are-ten-things-i-learned-on-the-way-to-getting-published/

How to Market Your Book to Get Worldwide Exposure: https://insights.bookbub.com/ideas-for-getting-your-book-more-international-exposure/

Rambling About Revisions: https://pcwrede.com/pcw-wp/rambling-about-revisions/

The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World (how people traveled in olden days): https://orbis.stanford.edu/

Featured Market

Nightmare Diaries anthology wants dark speculative fiction, pays $.10/word.

Moonstruck Books will publish an anthology of dark fiction titled Nightmare Diaries in Spring 2025. We are seeking short stories, fairy tales, flash fiction, and novellas of 500-10,000 words.Moonstruck Books

Basics: dark fiction, 500 – 10,000 words, $.10/word, unknown reprint policy, due 12/27/23.

Guidelines: https://www.moonstruck-books.com/submissions

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of updated market listings.

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists

Feel free to share this blog post/newsletter with others by whatever means you like, as long as you include all of it. The next update of Aswiebe's Market List will be after 9/15/2023. If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/
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Revising Parallel Scenes, plus Aswiebe’s Market List updates

Thoughts in Passing

Revising Parallel Scenes

All too often, the revision process involves simultaneously editing two (or more!) scenes to make them line up. This can happen when one scene is dependent on the other. It can happen when showing the same events from multiple different PoVs. It can happen when writing scenes out-of-sequence. It can even happen when the writer had a beautiful brainstorm late in the writing process and to set it up properly, they need to change earlier events to align. *cough, cough*

For on-paper revisions, it’s straightforward enough. Just print out copies of the relevant scenes and set them beside each other on the table. Scribble red ink here, there, and everywhere. Voila! But when moving around large chunks of text, digital revisions may be easier. This is when the idea of a “Working Scenes” file (or two!) comes in handy.

Consider it like a scratchpad. Mine is just an empty document, unless I’m actively working on meshing two scenes. Then I copy one of the scenes from my Work in Progress over into Working Scenes, arrange the file windows next to each other so I can see both at the same time, and adjust both at the same time. I usually keep the scene that needs the most work in the Work in Progress window, and the one that needs few or no adjustments in Working Scenes. If I do make changes in Working Scenes, I bold the section that will need to replace the original. If the changes are extensive enough, I replace the entire section in the original.

Once I’ve made my changes in both scenes, and moved the Working Scene changes back into the Work in Progress, it’s done! Then I delete the scene from Working Scenes. And voila, it’s a blank slate ready for the next round of adjustments!

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

Oh my slithy toves, let me warn you of the perils of the parenthetical “fix this later” note! Kidding. It’s actually a great tool, as long as you go back and fix things sooner-later instead of later-later. I … did not.

In happier news, today I have discovered that my shoulder-cat, Creamsicle, is happy to sit on my shoulders even when I am *not* sitting in a wingback chair. This is great, because my preferred “office chair” is actually an exercise ball with no back at all. I had been delaying putting it back at my desk because I like having Creamsicle keep me company. Now I know that I don’t need to give up either one. Of course, it’s too hot to work in my attic office in this hellish heatwave. But soon!

Me, with a cat draped around my shoulders like a scarf.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

“Write with Love” and Other Advice from Chuck Tingle: https://www.tor.com/2023/07/25/write-with-love-and-other-advice-from-chuck-tingle/

Growth-Centered Story Structure: https://jessmahler.com/growth-centered-story-structure/

12 Dos and Don’ts of Revealing Critical Backstory in a Novel: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/12-dos-and-donts-of-revealing-critical-backstory-in-a-novel

Publishing: Expectations vs. Reality: https://ilona-andrews.com/blog/publishing-expectations-vs-reality/

Featured Market

The SciFidea Award contest is for Dyson Sphere-themed novels and novellas.

The submitted works should be within the realm of science fiction, and must show a new worldview that conforms with scientific logic.

The work involves both the technical setting of the Dyson Sphere (overall structure, the scale and the size, construction materials and methods, etc.) and the ecological environment of the internal civilization (gravity changes, alternation of day and night, species distribution, etc.).

The writing should be smooth, the imagination and speculation should be creative and novel, and the plot should convey a sense of wonder.

SciFidea

Basics: themed SF, 30,000 – 100,000 words, 10 winners earn $20,000, no reprints, due 8/31/23. Guidelines: https://contest.scifidea.org/

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they're looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/.  For all the hundreds of listings, go to Aswiebe's Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!
Screenshot of market lists update. Click to go to New Updates page.

Click to see details of the latest updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists

The next update of Aswiebe’s Market List will be after 08/15/2023.

If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/

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You Missed a Spot!

When you think you already plotted your story … but when you’re thiiiiiis close to the end, you find out you left out an important bridge. And by you, I mean me. It happens to the best of us plotters, no matter how intricately we think we’ve woven our web.

So when the web is 98% constructed, what do I do when I discover the missing 2% of the pattern?

I sulk.

No, really. First, I allow myself to be justifiably cranky at my past self who assured me that the job was done and everything would be fine and all I had to do was follow the map. What a slacker! Past Me is fired!

Unfortunately, that still leaves the job for Present Me. I plot best with pen and paper (this could be a liability if I ever plan a murder). So I get out my notebook and pen and scribble down all the end conditions that I need the bridge to connect to. Then I work backwards. What is the smallest step that has to occur to get to that end point? Okay, got it. Rinse and repeat.

Sometimes, I discover that the bridge just won’t be structurally sound if I try to connect it to one of those end conditions. That sucks, because it means that I have to change the already plotted ending. It extra sucks if I’ve already written part of the doomed scene. But eventually, the gossamer bridge that I’m plotting becomes solid and real. Then I breathe a sigh of relief and get back to putting in the words until I get to The End.

What I’ve been up to lately, writing-wise:

The kids are out of school, I went to the (excellent as always) 4th Street Fantasy Convention, we had a week in Kansas City, 4th of July and CONvergence are coming up, and–what’s that you say? That isn’t writing? Very observant of you.

Things Shiny or Useful

Archive of all shiny or useful links: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/shiny-or-useful-writing-links/

Defy Parkinson’s Law to Be More Productive: https://lifehacker.com/defy-parkinson-s-law-to-be-more-productive-1850565701

7 Tips for Choosing a Title You Love: https://careerauthors.com/7-tips-for-choosing-a-title-you-love/

Featured Market

Successfully launched Monstrous Magazine wants horror flash fiction, pays $.06/word.

We’re launching a print magazine! Monstrous will contain comics, prose fiction, and articles.

FLASH FICTION

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Horror Flash Fiction for the first issue, to be published later this year. There’s no theme, but we do like monsters, pulp, and classic horror films. Focus should be on fast-paced entertaining stories. We’ll take a limited amount of fantasy, but make it dark and action packed. No science fiction or detective fiction. No reprints.

Monstrous Magazine

Basics: horror, 1,000 – 2,000 words, pays $.06/wd, no reprints, first submission period closes 7/27/23. Guidelines: https://monstrousbooks.com/submissions

Market List Updates

To see all the details about these new listings and what they’re looking for, go to https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/new/. For hundreds of other listings, go to Aswiebe’s Market List and download the latest version of the spreadsheet, or view it online at https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/marketlistonline/. Best read on a bigger screen!

Screenshot of market lists update. Click to go to New Updates page.

Click to see the hot new updates!

Keep writing, keep submitting, and good luck!

Abra Staffin-Wiebe, Keeper of Lists
Aswiebe’s Market List
Abra Staffin-Wiebe’s Author Website

The next update of Aswiebe's Market List will be after 7/15/2023.If you don’t want to miss an update, subscribe to the Aswiebe’s Market List newsletter: https://aswiebe.com/marketlist/subscribe-to-market-list/
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